Ekagrata is the Sanskrit term meaning One-Pointedness, an idea central to the Yogic practice of meditation.  There is the concentration of the single act of meditation at a  particular time and there is the practice of making one's whole life focused on a single goal. It is called the line of life's meditation.  The one is a component of the other.  That is our theme for reflection this week.  Quotes will be posted to spur comments and questions.

"One must develop those spontaneous reflexes whereby one confronts and dispels distracting thoughts without fascination or excess, bringing the mind back again to the main focus of attention."— The Aquarian Almanac

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July 18, 2015  Theme for the Week: Ekagrata: One-Pointedness

“Making the mind one-pointed, restraining mental and sensory activity, let him, seated upon this seat, practice yoga for the purification of the self.”

—Shri Krishna

“If thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light.”

—Jesus

This statement of Jesus really does remind one of a laser beam, or a magnifying glass focusing light into a single spot.

July 19, 2015   Theme for the Week: Ekagrata: One-Pointedness

“Exercise is the uninterrupted, or repeated effort that the mind shall remain in its unmoved state.”

 — Patanjali

“By the force of effort, one completely pacifies thought and reaches one-pointedness.”

 — Tsong Kha Pa

In addition to the one-pointedness that is required in meditation,  the singularity of purpose in our life may be even more important.  When all intentions, thoughts and actions are devoted to the SELF, one then becomes the embodiment of truths and light. 

This quote captures the process so beautifully - If thine eye be single, the whole body shall be full of light.          

Occultism is not to be trifled with.  It demands all or nothing.  ML p 460

 

How does one devote all thoughts and actions to the Self, practically speaking?  How does one do that?  What does one do?

Isolation Gerry.  

I figure that there is no other way to devote actions and thought to the Self other than pure isolation, or detachment.  It requires far more than a 9 second attention span, as we know.  By isolation I am suggesting a "top down" approach on ways to view the body and all of the adhering principles.  If one is able to separate themselves from the notional idea that the body is a personal thing, and see it as a representation of Humanity, then self interest is lost and replaced by a universal consideration of the collective whole. 

Practically speaing about this is difficult.  This is one of the subjects I feel that one must try to elevate their own understanding by way of Ekagrata.  

I like to think of inspiration as being connected with this. 

" I am suggesting a "top down" approach on ways to view the body and all of the adhering principles.  If one is able to separate themselves from the notional idea that the body is a personal thing, and see it as a representation of Humanity, then self interest is lost and replaced by a universal consideration of the collective whole. "

Very interesting and practical suggestion.  Thank you.

July 20,  2015  Theme of the Week: Ekagrata: One-Pointedness

“If we do all our acts, small and great, every moment, for the sake of the whole human race, as representing the Supreme Self, then every cell and fibre of the body and inner man will be turned in one direction, resulting in perfect concentration.”

— W.Q. Judge

Maybe this is part of the answer to the question I just raised.

July 21,  2015     Theme for the Week: Ekagrata: One-Pointedness

“The Yogin will have no conflict of loyalties.  He will have his mind filled with the Lord, his only goal will be Him, his only object of worship will be Him.”

— Shankaracharya

“My heart rises;

I fix my eyes upon You,

Next to You, beside You

O Giver of Life.”

— Geshe Rabten

July 22, 2015     Theme of the Week:  Ekagrata: One-Pointedness

 “Keep your mouth shut, guard the senses, and life is ever full.”

— Lao Tzu

 “Let your eyes look directly forward, and your gaze be straight before you.”

— Proverbs

Why is focusing the mind so difficult?  Why is keeping on task such a struggle for human beings?

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Permalink Reply by David Reigle on July 23, 2015 at 8:19am

It is only getting worse; goldfish now have longer attention spans than humans. Goldfish can hold their attention for an average of 9 seconds, while a new study showed that people can only hold their attention spans for 8 seconds. This is down from 12 seconds in the year 2000. It is thought that increasingly digital lifestyles are to blame for this decrease in attention spans, where people routinely reach for their smart phones, even in the midst of other activities, including at the workplace. You can download the report, "Attention Spans," produced by Microsoft Canada, from the Microsoft website:http://advertising.microsoft.com/en/cl/31966/how-does-digital-affec...

Permalink Reply by Gerry Kiffe on July 23, 2015 at 6:17pm

What youth lack in attention span they more than make up in sympathy.  Young people are much more in touch with what is going on in the world than previous generations.  Fragmentation of consciousness is exacerbated by the information age for sure.  It is forcing us to become more discriminating.

Permalink Reply by ModeratorTN on July 23, 2015 at 1:59pm

July 23, 2015    Theme for the Week: Ekagrata: One-Pointedness

“Of chief importance for practice and insight

is your Guru’ overbrooding influence.

This is conditioned by your attitude and conviction,

So approach him with one-pointed mind.”   

  —  The VIIth Dalai Lama