After a wonderful opening discussion on the Role of Sacred Texts, in which we really delved into the meaning and power of the sacred, we'll now explore something exceedingly important, and that is our approach to that which is sacred.

The question we'd like to place before everyone is this:

What is the right approach, the right attitude or posture by which we can come to the sacred texts such that we might truly benefit from what they have to offer?

Comments and questions are very much welcome! We also benefit greatly from personal insights gained from experience, from quotations drawn from sacred texts that help explore an idea, and so on. So please feel free to share :)

Also, don't forget to check out our growing library of Sacred Texts, which we can use to aid us in this study group:

http://www.universaltheosophy.com/sacred-texts/

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Would also like to pose the question: what role does reverence play in our approach to sacred texts, teachers, fellow students, etc.?

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To me, we should respect that everyone has their own work to do spiritually and that they choose their own path. Reverence or respect can’t mean that everyone in the room agrees, nodding approval, to the point that no real thought is being provoked, that no one is willing to say what the conflicts are so that truths can be sorted out.  If our discussions don’t provoke thought, then we need to get more diversity in thought into the virtual room with us. And we own our efforts to both learn and participate in the process that helps us learn.

Quote from George Fox: “Take care that all your offerings be free, and of your own, that has cost you something; so that ye may not offer of that which is another man's, or that which ye are entrusted withal, and not your own.”

It reminds me of the Gita quote about doing your own work.

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Thanks Di! This is so very well said. :)

It seems exceedingly important to me that we all develop this respect for one another, and for each other's teachers, for the texts or practices another is drawn to, etc.. And like you say, we can still disagree, or have preferences for other teachers/teachings, etc., but still work together as fellow-students.

A follow-up question comes to mind: what might we look at as the foundation of this reverence or respect, whether towards other students or towards sacred texts or teachers?

Oh, and here's the Gita quote if anyone is interested (I believe this is the one you meant):

"It is better to do one’s own duty, even though it be devoid of excellence, than to perform another’s duty well. It is better to perish in the performance of one’s own duty; the duty of another is full of danger." - Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 3

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It is the quote, thanks.

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I am sure many of us would agree that there are many different approaches to the spiritual life and even to reading the sacred texts to get the most out of them.  But there must be some common strands in all the most beneficial approaches.  One of these strands most definitely is a sense of trust and gratitude.  When some writing has won our trust, (and that is a process worth discussing in and of itself), then our task becomes one of understanding first and judging second.  This is far from blind faith which demands obedience and acceptance without any examination.  The point here is once a teacher or a text wins our confidence we give it the benefit of the doubt and that takes the form of assuming it is valuable and seeking to understand its meaning prior to any judgement.  This is not the same as literal dogmatic acceptance of a text.

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Thanks Gerry. I think this is an important aspect of our approach and I'm glad you made these distinctions between this (approaching with trust, benefit of the doubt, etc.) and either dogma or blind faith or obedience, etc..

Could you briefly touch on the process by which a text or teacher may win our trust?

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I cannot write over the weekend, which gives me time to make notes, and sometimes I am not sure that I’m not answering more than one question at a time or at the right point in the thread. I have absorbed so much from various messages. In terms of “benefiting from right approach”:

Overall our task is to understand who we really are. As is true of the Secret Doctrine (I:xlvi): “Every reader will inevitably judge the statements made from the stand-point of his own knowledge, experience, and consciousness, based on what he has already learnt.” But it is our task to understand what we know, why, and to be willing to unlearn previous assumptions, esp if necessary.  

And I like to look at similarities in all texts. What is important to me is that I have a right to say that this all these sacred texts fall under my heritage as a human, it is my own evolution that I’m studying and listening to, not something foreign to me (even though it may not be a voice from the culture I was raised in). Our spiritual history did not begin with recorded history or even oral histories, and I have refused to be limited to certain texts as the end-all authority. This is a benefit of reincarnation, it seems. It has amazed me to see the ways in texts such as the Gita and Upanishads, even the Gospel of John, record this history. 

There are quotes I don’t have at hand about wisdom being there when you are ready for it. While we don’t like to think of ourselves as limited to our culture, or our own level of progress, we are.  Respect requires us to appreciate both where we’ve been and where we are going. Here are two more of my favorite quotes:

(1)  Seek this wisdom by doing service, by strong search, by questions, and by humility; the wise who see the truth will communicate it unto thee, and knowing which thou shalt never again fall into error. . . . There is no purifier in this world to be compared to spiritual knowledge; and he who is perfected in devotion findeth spiritual knowledge springing up spontaneously in himself in the progress of time. -- Bhagavad-Gita 4:34-5, 38 (Judge Recension)

(2)  … Get wisdom. Though it cost all you have, get understanding. / Cherish her, and she will exalt you; embrace her, and she will honor you. / Above all else, guard your heart, for everything you do flows from it.  ~Prov 4.7-8, 23

Second, I think the right approach considers the coherence of the cosmological view— Quote from William Q. Judge in The Path for March, 1892, p. 382: “If any authority pertains to TheSecret Doctrine, it must be sought inside, not outside. It must rest on its comprehensiveness, its completeness, its continuity and reasonableness; in other words, on its philosophical synthesis, …”

To achieve this we may have to take extraordinary steps to expand our thinking, wondering first how something could be true, appreciate the knowledge and absorb the lessons it offers.  This is how we transcend our current karmic level of understanding toward a higher level. We live in culture, for the most part, that expects us to deal with info, decide, and move on, but that’s not what’s needed here.  Sometimes it takes a while to truly work through the real meaning and application to our lives. 

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Thanks Di. This is wonderful.

But it is our task to understand what we know, why, and to be willing to unlearn previous assumptions, esp if necessary. 

I think you're right on here. That willingness to both learn and unlearn is huge. If we approach a sacred text with a chip on our shoulder, assuming 'I know best', we probably won't benefit from it. If we approach with an openness - like Gerry says: giving it the benefit of the doubt - then we may just learn something new or unlearn something old.

And I like to look at similarities in all texts. What is important to me is that I have a right to say that this all these sacred texts fall under my heritage as a human...

Indeed, this underlies the very motivation for this Sacred Texts study group. As we proceed we'll begin to go into some of these key similarities. :)

We live in culture, for the most part, that expects us to deal with info, decide, and move on, but that’s not what’s needed here.  Sometimes it takes a while to truly work through the real meaning and application to our lives.

I couldn't agree more!

Given these ideas, is there a certain humility that must be present in our approach? And if so, how does one develop it?

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The questions that I'm holding now from various messages here all involve "what is the foundation" for reverence or trust or respect (for a diversity of thoughts/paths/etc.).  I continue to mull this over and I'll have the long holiday weekend, starting tomorrow, to think about it. 

The first thing to come to mind, however, is the third principle stated in the Secret Doctrine, the obligatory pilgrimage according to karmic and cyclic laws, which is both self-devised and interdependent.   

The second thing to come to mind is the foundational virtues or paramitas, one of which is generosity (of spirit) and, then too, patience.  Both are good goals to practice.

One of the objects of any theosophical group, I believe, is to form a nucleus of brotherhood, and this isn't necessarily an official or highly defined group.  It requires that one work well together or try to keep a high level of ideals and intentions, and not drift down too far into the materialistic world (Sattvic thinking, according to the gunas in the Gita).

These things are close to an agreed-upon approach to me, a covenant perhaps among ourselves.  But I don't know if I'm on the track to thinking strongly what it is that leads us to this reverence, trust or respect for doctrines, teachers, etc.  I look forward to reading what others say when I get back online. 

My thanks go to all of you for this conversation. 

 

 

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"what is the foundation" for reverence or trust or respect?

I agree... this is a central question for us all to probe into.

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Much has been written in the The Secret Doctrine Forum as to how the student should approach the SD (not that I agree with everything stated therein).  'Judging a work by its merits' is one of ways most often repeated in this respect.  What would be the reasons for approaching spiritual or religious texts in a different manner to those suggested for the SD?

I refer to them as 'spiritual or religious' because we can come to some objective agreement as to whether a text falls into this category regardless of whether it is part of the spiritual path we each may follow.  

Whether a text is regarded as 'sacred' may be a matter of subjective experience or simply decreed as such by the specific tradition to which it belongs.

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I'm not sure I would approach spiritual or religious texts differently than the SD, except for the poetry and rhythm, structurally speaking, which may have imagery and symbolic meaning that straight prose does not. Then again the stanzas are a pretty nifty meditation, to some. 

I agree that most people could reach a concensus about what qualifies as sacred texts, and that few if any would include the SD, nor would I in fact.  It's true too that maybe I don't hold enough reverence for sacred texts to begin with.  But I have sought these texts out for any wisdom they hold and been delighted by a few nuggets. I only have trouble when sacred is defined as the "word of God" or infallible or having only one interpretation. I have had those conversations before. 

If we look at how texts draw out an individual's intuitive understanding or behavior, then perhaps I would find some common ground ... and if others could accept that, I would agree with saying it's "a matter of subjective experience or simply decreed as as such by the specific tradition."  

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Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 20, 2012 at 5:14pm
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I agree that most people could reach a concensus about what qualifies as sacred texts...

I would agree with this, in general. At least, I've always thought this way. But I must say, it's been a very interesting process gathering sacred texts for our section on Universal Theosophy. I've had to continually ask myself: "does this qualify?" and I've found myself reaching further than I thought - outside the bounds of what I might normally consider a sacred text.

It's easy when it comes to a handful of texts: Dhammapada, Gita, Tao Te Ching, Yoga Aphorisms, etc., but gets increasingly tricky the further one goes. For instance, Plato is almost never included (in my experience) among what people would think of as "sacred literature". But is the sacred literature of the world complete without him? Would someone like Thomas Taylor have considered Plato sacred? (I'd have to assume yes)

In the end I've tried to look at it in terms of traditions, asking questions like: what is the text people of this or that tradition would consider sacred, and why, and do we feel the same from a theosophical perspective? Are there texts in a tradition that may get less attention than others but may be considered the pinnacle of the sacred in that tradition from a theosophical perspective (i.e. the Zohar, Gospel of Thomas, etc)? And so on.

It's been a wonderful exercise as I've had to try to look outside of my own perspective to consider what others might consider sacred and why.

I'd also have to agree with you in that I don't personally label the SD as a "sacred text", but I do label the Voice of the Silence as such. Which brings up the question: what is the quality or aspect that leads one to categorize this way? Is it a question, as you mention, of poeticism, imagery, etc., or perhaps subject matter, or other factors? Is it simply a heart-recognition that can't necessarily be explained logically or through reason alone?

One thing I'm coming to consider is that perhaps what we feel as sacred is such because it appeals to a certain part of our nature - call it the Moral aspect of our Self, perhaps. Sacred Texts do seem to have this quality in common: a focus on ethics and morality and conduct in human life - a focus on living the life.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 24, 2012 at 4:56pm
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I wonder if anyone has any thoughts on this paragraph, from above:

"One thing I'm coming to consider is that perhaps what we feel as sacred is such because it appeals to a certain part of our nature - call it the Moral aspect of our Self, perhaps. Sacred Texts do seem to have this quality in common: a focus on ethics and morality and conduct in human life - a focus on living the life."

Permalink Reply by Peter on November 21, 2012 at 2:09am
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Jon & Di,

re: defining texts as sacred or not.

I was saying something different, which I've obviously not communicated clearly enough in my post. I think there is a case for distinguishing between a) texts we regard as religious or spiritual and b) texts that we regard as sacred.

We might find a great deal of agreement among people from different spiritual paths or none at all as to whether a text comes under the category of religious or spiritual. There are likely to be a number of objective factors we could agree upon that if present would define a text in this way e.g. reference to the divine, the soul, an underlying meaning and purpose to life & so on.

But whether those same people would agree that a particular text is sacred might be another matter. That's more likely to come down to subjective factors - some of which we talked about in part 1 - or simply that a particular tradition has determined that a specific text is sacred to that tradition.

It is stated that those portions of the Secret Doctrine that are concerned with esoteric teachings, rather than science etc, are the triple work of HPB and the Masters M and KH, who in turn are lifting the veil of some of 'the secrets of the sanctuary'. (Seehttp://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/invit-sd/invsd-4.htm) Ye, and speaking generally, we (theosophists) tend not to see the Secret Doctrine as sacred and it's rare even for someone to refer to it as a work containing sacred truths. In our Secret Doctrine forum we have discussed, for example, that the student should not believe something just because it is stated in the SD, the work must be judged by its merits and it's truths verified by our own endeavours & so on.

At the same time there are many religious texts that are quite, if not entirely, exoteric in nature which we do refer to as being 'sacred texts' - granting them a status that has yet to be verified through our own investigation.
Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 24, 2012 at 4:55pm
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Very well put Peter. I think this explanation really shows just how tricky, and subjective the term sacred really is. The 'sacredness' of a text may, ultimately, come down to an inner recognition or connection, which, like you say, could vary greatly between individuals, even individuals within a shared tradition.

Permalink Reply by Peter on November 21, 2012 at 3:59am
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Clarification:

In previous post I wrote:

"We might find a great deal of agreement among people from different spiritual paths or none at all as to whether a text comes under the category of religious or spiritual."

I meant, of course, 'people from different paths or no path at all'. The above makes it sound like the might have a great deal of agreement or none at all.
Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 24, 2012 at 4:44pm
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Is there a "right" way and a "wrong" way to read a sacred text? What difference in approach might we take versus reading a textbook or a novel?

Permalink Reply by Sharisse on November 25, 2012 at 1:41pm
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I think, my limited view, it's not necessarily wrong or right, but maybe to not limit our beliefs in the texts, as belief is not knowing, but rather be open and to test them in our own experience to find which is true and sacred to our own 'self'. That would be different than just reading a novel as a good book, or assuming they are sacred because someone says so. And also to say something on your wondering of any thoughts which relates to this also, if we act upon our own sacredness within, everything on the outside could be viewed as sacred. From within, without.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 26, 2012 at 9:49am
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Thanks Sharisse, this is wonderful. I particularly like:

"be open and to test them in our own experience to find which is true and sacred to our own 'self'."

Permalink Reply by Jimmy on November 25, 2012 at 6:50pm
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It seems to me that it's the lower portion of mind that is active in the reading of ordinary textbooks and novels, and it sort of defeats purpose of a sacred text if read in this way. Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with the use of lower and higher Manas. Each is good and valuable on it's own plane. Of course, the human mind must be brought into service to a certain extent when reading a sacred text in order to read it at all, but in my opinion it should be done with the mental gaze fixed on the Light above. A true sacred text is a product of Superconscious Mind, and speaks to, and awakens, the Inner Man when read inwardly and upwardly. There's a little theosophical classic that I've always treasured as a sacred text called Light on the Path. The following quote from the book makes a claim about the "way" it was written, and I think this is true of other sacred texts as well:

"The whole of Light on the Path is written in an astral cypher and can therefore only be deciphered by one who reads astrally."

This is what I mean by reading inwardly.
Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 26, 2012 at 9:51am
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The idea that sacred texts are a product of "superconscious mind" and that they awaken the inner man resonates with me as well.

Permalink Reply by Di Kaylor on November 26, 2012 at 2:01pm
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I couldn't get my mind thinking about this at all, and then you said this so nicely. It's good to prepare to read the sacred text, by moving into a "zone" of mindfulness and a contemplative pace, undistracted by the noise of the day.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 26, 2012 at 3:13pm
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Thanks Di. I like the way you put this: "moving into a zone". I can certainly agree with that. I think, in a sense, this may be where 'ritual' comes into the picture. If we just casually pick up a sacred text while munching on dinner and read it with half-concentration I imagine we get much less than if we take the time to go through a self-devised 'ritual' of sorts to set ourselves up with focused time to spend with the text - like taking a step out of our regular day and into "the zone". ;)

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Permalink Reply by Di Kaylor on November 26, 2012 at 3:47pm
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Lifetime meditation, or where your focus is most the time (based on your character and approach to living), can contribute to finding the higher ground (or that zone) more easily, and I find that regular daily meditation or time spent in the zone (perhaps with mantras) contributes to shaping that lifetime meditation. 

Two years ago, to support a friend who was going to do pre-dawn, 40-day, pre-winter-solstice chanting, I said I'd get up and do it for myself at home with self-devised mantras. And for the most part I did it.  It was great. And I learned it was important to me, during times of crisis, to have something like this to fall back into (more than childhood songs).  I use mantras found in the Gita to remind of the oneness of the universe and that I am that.  It moves me into a zone that can only be good for anything that comes.  The more we live in a zone as part of each day, habitually, the more easily we can call it to the surface, and much harder to fall into unfortunate habits or distractions.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 28, 2012 at 9:39am
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I can relate to the benefits of recitation of mantras in the sense of putting us in a positive mental state for the day. A while back (years ago) I took up the task of chanting the lalita sahasranama (1000 names of the divine mother) each morning as a spiritual practice. This caused me to carry a certain 'frame of mind' throughout the day and I saw great benefits in relationships and interactions.

I think there's really something to be said for practices, routines, etc., that help root us to the higher aspects of our self, as, like you say, these can help us shape our lifetime meditation.

Permalink Reply by Peter on December 3, 2012 at 5:19am
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"The whole of Light on the Path is written in an astral cypher and can therefore only be deciphered by one who reads astrally."

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I would keep an open mind about that passage from Light on the Path and what it means, as it forms part of the Comments by the Author section, which is generally understood to be written by Mabel Collins herself, rather than by the Adept who is said to have dictated those Rules to her.

There is some interesting background information to that work in The Collected Writings of HPB, vol 8, pp 427-430.  On page 430 HPB is quoted as raising a caution about what is written in Rule 20 of Part 1, as one:

"whose Occult venom and close relationship to Tantrika Black Magic has never been suspected by the innocent and sincere admirers of this otherwise priceless little book,the main body of which only was dictated by a true Adept, and the rest added from the inner consciousness of Miss Mabel Collins..."  (CW VIII 430; italic emphasis in the original quote.)

Permalink Reply by Jimmy on December 6, 2012 at 12:16pm
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Thanks Peter! I interpret that passage to mean that the book is written in an "inner language" that can only be discerned by sensing the spirit behind the words. Any text which aims to express the dynamic richness and vibrancy of Spirit fails in the dead letter reading of the word. At best, sacred text only points toward its Source; this is the limitation of human language. What is your interpretation of that passage?

I would like to read the article that you mention, but I don't have a hard copy of the book and I can't find it online. Do you have a link?
Permalink Reply by Peter on December 7, 2012 at 4:02am
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Hi Jimmy - I think what you say about sacred texts and about 'sensing the spirit behind the words' is very sound, and I agree with you.

I believe Mabel Collins is referring to the use of the astral senses and their development in this passage, not to the intuitive faculty.  All I'm suggesting is that people keep an open mind about Mabel Collins' writings in general, noting which are parts are said to have been dictated by an Adept and those which come from herself.

Unfortunately, that particular reference I gave you to the Collected Writings isn't on line. It's part of the Bibliography section, which gives background history to people and to some of the works cited. Most of the Bibliographies to each volume aren't included in the digital versions, which is a shame because there's very useful information in some of them.

There is a reference online and in the same volume VIII to HPB having to intervene in another work of Mabel Collins: the serialised version of "The Blossom and the Fruit". HPB was said to be concerned that Mabel Collins was seriously misleading the reader about White and Black Magic in that particular story. Here is the link:

http://www.katinkahesselink.net/blavatsky/articles/v8/y1887_017.htm

If we could make a connection through the 'Friends' link on this site I could scan and send you an attachment for the original reference I gave you - CW VIII 427-430. It's not an article, but a brief history relating to Light on the Path made by the Compiler of the Collected Writings.  

Permalink Reply by barbaram on December 7, 2012 at 9:23am
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Hi Peter:

I would appreciate it if you could send me the attachment as well. 

I read Light on the Path and all of Mabel Collin's books when I was a teenager and liked them a lot .  I was surprised to learn many years later that she had a mental breakdown and I started to look into it.  The history of her involvement with HPB and the TS movement is interesting.  Below is a link from a TS conference on this subject.   

http://www.katinkahesselink.net/his/farnell3.html

 

 

 

Permalink Reply by Peter on December 7, 2012 at 10:45am
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Thank you for the link, Barbara.  It's a far from objective historical account of Mabel Collins encounter with HPB, especially of the author's portrayal of HPB.  But I wouldn't want to give any time over to discussing it.

Whatever her mistakes, let's wish that the fine and noble qualities that brought Mabel Collins into the sphere of influence of that particular Adept and of HPB remain with her and aid her in her journey in the next incarnation.

I'll try Jon's suggestion when I've scanned in the pages.

Permalink Reply by barbaram on December 8, 2012 at 3:29pm
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Yes, Peter, I agree that article is less objective than desired.  One thing we could glean from history,   which is,  there were questions about the source of the works by Collins.  We should just leave it as that. 

I hope we all someday will gain the ability to go behind the words and discern the energies and influences of any text.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on December 7, 2012 at 10:06am
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Peter, if you can scan the page, there is the ability to upload it as an attachment to a post in this discussion. When you 'reply', at the bottom of the text-field you'll see "Upload Files".

Permalink Reply by Jimmy on December 7, 2012 at 10:24pm
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Peter, I'll definitely heed your advice about Light on the Path. I haven't read any other Mabel Collins books, but I'll do the same if I run across them. I've been wanting to get the entire set of Collected Writings for some time now. I've been holding out for a good used book offer, but haven't found one yet. If you're willing to scan the selection from the bibliography, I'd love to read it. I'll send you my email address. A thousand thanks!!
Permalink Reply by Gerry Kiffe on November 26, 2012 at 3:08pm
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How about a better way versus a worse way rather than right or wrong?  It seems a little bit like the question, "is there a right way and a wrong way to eat spinach?"   Spinach is good for you whether you eat it too fast or too slow, with gratitude or not, with adequate chewing or not etc.  But you would get the greater benefit from eating slowly perhaps.  It is very difficult to get into the optimal and most receptive state of mind at any given point of time.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 26, 2012 at 3:14pm
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How can one ensure that what one studies in a sacred text stays with them through the course of a day, even through trouble and trauma?

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Permalink Reply by Di Kaylor on November 26, 2012 at 3:49pm
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Repetition helps.  Reading and discussing them helps us see them from different perspectives, perhaps deepening our understanding. 

Permalink Reply by Sharisse on November 26, 2012 at 11:28pm
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One thing that stands out during any crisis, stress, trouble or trauma are emotions. Emotions run high, whether defensive or offensive. Words, actions and reactions come out rapidly, without thought, for most. The lower monkey mind as I have been learning, and I am guilty of this myself through out my experiences. Yet I do notice when I stop, pause, and reconnect with the mental above the emotions and then speak, act or react, it's truer, calmer, balanced and more caring then what could of just spewed out because of emotions. So in the way I know of now, I can view this question in relation to this reconnecting and centering over the emotions during the trouble and trauma and not be fatigued of the tribulation afterward.  

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 28, 2012 at 9:44am
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This is a very good point. Goes to the heart of the question: which part of ourselves is going to rule us? Are we going to be run by our 'monkey mind' or are we going to be run by the stable, higher mind?

I think our use of sacred texts can certainly help with this 'reconnecting and centering'.

Permalink Reply by Sharisse on November 28, 2012 at 10:33pm
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Reminds me of Hakuin's poem:

The monkey is reaching
For the moon in the water.
Until death overtakes him
He'll never give up.
If he'd let go the branch and
Disappear in the deep pool,
The whole world would shine
With dazzling pureness.

Permalink Reply by Jon Fergus on November 27, 2012 at 12:19pm
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Thanks Nicholas. This is excellent, and really shows the level of reverence brought to the text by these practitioners.

Permalink Reply by Sharisse on November 28, 2012 at 10:20pm
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I thought about what you expressed here today. And how true it became. Whether one is religious or not, oblatio. However one wants to view this, themselves. Sometimes, our lives are full; we must make sacrifices, and/or room for the Sacred itself. Everyone does this in their own way, no matter how slight or boundless. This act alone, at very least, can keep you within the reach of Sacred-ness and not lose sight of one's pilgrimage.

Permalink Reply by Peter on November 27, 2012 at 3:30am
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I think at the very least just go to the text, open a page, and make a start.  Don't worry too much whether there is a right way or a wrong way or whether one will remember or forget.

Rather, listen for what truly speaks to us and what doesn't; notice what awakens something of the profound - the sacred - in us and what doesn't; pay attention to what makes our lives more meaningful and what doesn't; make a note of and try to act upon what helps us to be better people - more inclined to see the rest of life as brothers and sisters - and what doesn't.

Then perhaps out of this we'll discover for ourselves - on the journey itself - what ways are more conducive than others to approaching 'the sacred' in religious and spiritual works. Then too, we might find ourselves genuinely marvelling with reverence at the knowledge and compassion of those who placed such wisdom in our path, waiting for our own foot steps to find them.

Whether we do this over breakfast, sitting on a busy bus on the way to work, in a coffee bar or in our private meditative space is less important than just opening that page and getting on with it.

Self-induced and self-devised efforts, checked by our Karma, is the cornerstone of all spiritual progress, from the lowest up to the highest. (See SD I 17)

Permalink Reply by Di Kaylor on November 28, 2012 at 9:58am
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So true ...Trying is the first step.

>>Then too, we might find ourselves genuinely marvelling with reverence at the knowledge and compassion of those who placed such wisdom in our path, waiting for our own foot steps to find them. 

Slowing down and living our values have been strong, meaningful messages in my work with others, so that we can do just that.  They give a person space to follow their heart and "get on with it."

>>Self-induced and self-devised efforts, checked by our Karma, is the cornerstone of all spiritual progress, from the lowest up to the highest. (See SD I 17)... the bottom-line of individual evolution.