In this discussion group we explore the central tenets of Theosophy.  What better way to start than to explore Theosophia itself.  To get us started we will take up selected chapters from Robert Crosbies' Universal Theosophy.  If you have not read Robert Crosbie's writings before "the chapters of the book are drawn from lectures he gave in California", you will discover a Gandhian practicality, a Thoreau like clarity and a Martin Luther King like heart to his writings.

I will post some passages from the essay here and then feel free to comment and question them thereafter.  In a week or so I will post more passages from the same article until we need to move on.

From the Chapter: Theosophy in Daily LIfe

Find the whole article here:

http://www.phx-ult-lodge.org/AUNITHEO.htm#THEOSOPHY%20IN%20DAILY%20...

THEOSOPHY IN DAILY LIFE

    Many people think that religion means a preparation for death or the states of the future. Religion really means a preparation for and a knowledge of life—a living of our life as it should be lived. That which prepares for death is life, and ever living. Formal religions do not even answer the question, why is death—nor any of the other burning questions in daily life. Why do we have suffering and sorrow? Why are we here? What was the origin of man? Why so many different conditions among mankind; why are some born to sorrow, and others to joy; why some in lowly places, some in high; why some with great faculties and others with very few and poor ones? Justice demands an answer which is not furnished by religion, with its "Creator"—for if man is the creature of a creator he can not help himself and is absolutely irresponsible. Any being, if “perfect,” would maintain justice; yet there are injustices among men. The caprice or whim of a creator does not explain the difficulty. Any being, however great or high, must of necessity be limited, finite, and imperfect—something outside us, something which does not contain the universe but is contained by it.

    We have to go behind any idea of a Being, to the source of all being—to a basis common to the highest and to the lowest being. That basis and source is not to be found by looking outward at all, but is the very power to perceive, wherever there is life. Spirit, Life, Consciousness are the same in every being—undivided, however many and varied the perceptions. Evolution is not a compelling force from without, but the impelling force of Spirit from within, urging on to better and better expression. All advancement is from within. All the knowledge that we gain, all the experience that we obtain, is obtained and held within. Each one, then, is the Seer; all the rest are seen. So, the knowledge that we have to obtain is not information from without, not the thoughts of other men, but an understanding of our own essential nature, which represents every element in the great universe, from the basis of all life to every outward expression, and every possibility of further expression— just as each drop of water contains in itself everything existing in the great ocean from which it came. Nor does Law exist outside of us. Law is always inherent in Spirit; it is the action which brings re-action in every individual case, and to the collective mass of humanity. We are here under law and under justice. There is no such thing as injustice in the universe.

-Robert Crosbie

Moderator:  Let us hear your comments and questions.

 

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"So, the knowledge that we have to obtain is not information from without, not the thoughts of other men, but an understanding of our own essential nature, which represents every element in the great universe, from the basis of all life to every outward expression, and every possibility of further expression— just as each drop of water contains in itself everything existing in the great ocean from which it came."

This is the first time that I've read anything by Crosbie, and I'm a big fan already. I’d like to make a connection between his analogy of the ocean and our group study. As stated in our group Intro, the Secret Doctrine can be a "daunting study".  The study of the tenets of Theosophy can be daunting as well. However I believe that Crosbie has given us an important clue that may help to bring these tenets within arms-reach,  and allow our study to yield an edible fruit. He compares the essense of each person to a drop in the ocean of Life (what an amazing picture!). Extending this analogy to our study of the tenets, if the drop tries to study the immensity of the ocean, he'll probably get dizzy and fall over. But if the drop realizes that its substance is the same as the ocean substance, it only has to look within itself. Then the task becomes more manageable, and the student can form at least a mental link between himself and the Universal principles. I think this is a practical way to approach the tenets. And as to the question, "What is Theosophia?" Perhaps the drops will find Theosophia in the drops. ;)

 

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This reminds me of one of my favorite passages -

As it is Above so it is below;
As it is Within so it is without;
As in the Great so in the small;
There is but One Life and One Law.

-Hermes

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Beautiful Jimmy. Very well put. There definitely seems to be benefit in the idea that studying ourselves, we in fact study all things. In the SD, HPB makes it clear (to me, at least), that the basic outline of cosmogenesis given is applicable to any system by analogy and correspondence.

Just in regular life, I feel that coming to know myself better has helped immensely in coming to know others better - as one example of the idea in practice.

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When Mr. Crosbie says "All advancement is from within." what does this mean in practical terms?   How does this help to make our lives better?

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Without being too picky on semantics, it's probably worthwhile to attempt to bring in a few terms that we often use (both in our study and in society) and see if they can be defined in such a way as to become useful in our study. Words like 'advancement', 'understanding', 'information', 'knowledge' and so forth (without attempting to discuss them all in-depth :-) acquire  a different meaning in our study of theosophy from their common understanding in everyday use.

Understanding, I see as definitely happening "within", because no one can make you understand anything, as understanding is the internal recognition of 'a' truth (independent from intellectual concerns). Information is what we receive from "without", in common language referred to as knowledge, but it is actually 'only' information (verbal info, literature, examples in practice, etc,). It's not because we can repeat or memorize something that it constitutes understanding. We can ask the provocative question: "Does our literature contain any wisdom?" I would answer in the negative, because our literature contains objectively 'only' ink on paper, wrought however, in such a way that it becomes intelligible INFORMATION to our perception. Then what is the purpose of this literature if it doesn't contain any wisdom one might ask? I think we can use the interesting correspondence here with the activity of a vitamin. Do vitamins feed and nourish the body, nope! They act as chemical catalysts so that the food that we digest can become useful to our body. So with our mind, we can ingest the "spiritual" vitamins so that the food (daily life's experience) for our mind (constituted by concepts formed into thoughts) can be mentally digested and become of use through experience, resulting in understanding. Our "spiritual" vitamins are of no use if we keep the literature on the shelf. In their use however, the proper amount and combination may trigger the necessary responses in the food (thoughts/concepts) for our mind to nourish that mind to greater understanding. Advancement is thus the increasingly acquired UNDERSTANDING through experience (both inner and outer). HPB points out that "ethics is applied metaphysics", but the metaphysics have to be studied and understood. Study, application and understanding constitute to my mind at least, what advancement means in practical terms and helps us to make our lives and the lives of others better.

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Pierre, your comment made me remember a scene in the movie "Good Will Hunting".  The story is about a math prodigy that comes from the dirt poor projects of Boston and works as a custodian at MIT until he is discovered as a genius.  Anyhow, the character played by Matt Damon who is the brilliant individual mentioned above, stops into a bar near Harvard to pick up on some girls.  His best friend inadvertently gets caught in a lie about his attending Harvard while trying out his pick up lines on some Coeds, Matt's character steps in and takes over an obscure debate with the stuck up Harvard boy who thinks he is superior to the guys from the projects and bests this Harvard know it all.  And the way that he is bested is the interesting point here.  He points out to the haughty Harvard show off that every idea he has presented in his arguments are from a group of writers that he names one by one.  So he concluded his argument by saying, " and you are going to go through your entire life without a single original thought of your own while parroting the thoughts of all these dead guys."

So it begs the question: What does it mean to advance from within?  Your thoughts here I found very helpful on the subject.

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We are looking at the duality of within and without, specifically, the difference between knowledge and wisdom, the former relates to information acquired by book learning, the latter perceptive understanding acquired by the awakening of intuition. 

To grow (or advance) from within means to develop the higher principles in our being;  thus,  we are growing from within and expressing to without.  The process requires the clearing of the impediments by dimming the lower forces in our constitution which then allows the down flow of the higher forces (or buddhi energy) to manifest. 

When the hearts ascend, the spirits descend.       

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The process requires the clearing of the impediments by dimming the lower forces in our constitution...

This has got me investigating (not for the first time ;) questions like:

What might some of these impediments and forces be?

And how do we go about the process of dimming/clearing?

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To answer your questions, I think it really depends on the individuals - everyone is different.

This is one of the reasons why HPB did not give out any formal "techniques" to the public because everyone is at a different place with different karma. Furthermore, in SD, there is a reference that one progresses by finding a "self-devised" method.

In recent years I begin to understand one of the implications behind this statement, that is, in the process of discovery and development, one opens the intuition and builds a channel into one's Higher Self.  So, in a way, the means also fulfills one of the ends. 

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Yet one can be sure that one of the elements of the obscuration would be a limited or truncated sense of self at some level.

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Yes! to what barbaram said July 20

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As Krishna says in the Dhyaneswari: “When this Path is beheld . . . whether one sets out to the bloom of the east or to the chambers of the west, without moving, O holder of the bow, is the travelling in this road. In this path, to whatever place one would go,that place one’s own self becomes.” “Thou art the Path” is said to the adept guru and by the latter to the disciple, after initiation. “I am the way and the Path” says another MASTER.

This seems to shed some light on the idea of 'advancement from within'. As Pierre points out, this seems to be quite different than our typical ideas of 'advancement'.

In practical terms: one observation I'd make is that this lends itself to the idea that there is nothing 'out there' to be acquired or gained to accumulated or sought. And that can certainly impact the way we live our lives and how we relate to others.

Continuing on the Robert Crosbie article by the name posted in the discussion title:

Knowing something as to our essential nature, knowing something of the purpose of life, and that life is all made up of learning, knowing that the universe is all alive, and that there is in reality no injustice save that which we inflict upon our selves by re-action, we would take an entirely different view of life and put these ideas into daily practice. We would take the position which most of all we need to take—that of our own responsibility, which religions have taught us to shift on to some God or devil. Recognizing that each one of us is from the same Source and going towards the same goal, though the path will vary with the pilgrim, we will act toward each one as if he were a part of ourselves. Like us, each one is moving onward— perhaps below us, possibly above. From the one above, we can obtain help. To the one below, we can give help. Such is the interdependence which should exist between all conscious beings; and under such a conception our civilization would not be as it is now. We should not find every man’s hand raised against every other man. We should not see those in poor case finding fault with the wrong conditions, but finding fault rather with their own wrong relations to others at some time when they abused the power they had. We should see each one trying to discipline himself, trying to bring himself into proper relation with all the rest—not so much outwardly, perhaps, as inwardly; for we may be sure that if we make clean the inside of the bowl, the outside will take care of itself. We have no greater duty to perform than to make clear and clean our natures—to make them true, to make them in accord with the great object of all life, the evolution of soul.

We can not wait to make our start in this direction until the nation wakes up to Theosophy; for the nation will itself awake only when each individual wakes up to that which is in himself and by his thought and action instills a similar thought and action in other human beings. Supposing each one determined to do all he could for every other one wherever he could, do you think that anybody would suffer? Not one! There would be more to help than those to suffer. But we are afraid that if we so act, the other man will not. So we do not move at all along that line. The majority of people are thinking about quite other things. They are busy at the shrine of their gods of comfort, seeking to get the best of everything in life at the expense of someone else. Or they are seeking to acquire “the power of will,” so that they can get something for nothing from someone else. That is the kind of “will” which is generally desired, its object being the getting of exactly what one pleases. Is not this psychic banditry? Anything gotten that way is taken from another, and we shall have to pay it back to the uttermost farthing—if not in this life, then in some other, for the scales of justice are unerring.


Discussion is open to your thoughts, comments and particularly welcoming of your questions.

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Why is the serious taking of responsibility so crucial in Theosophy?

"We would take the position which most of all we need to take—that of our own responsibility, which religions have taught us to shift on to some God or devil." from the selection above

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One reason that comes to mind is the simple need for self-reliance. What the adepts and great teachers of humanity seem to be telling us is that we need to learn to stand on our own two feet, so to speak. Leaning on others or shifting responsibility keeps us from learning to truly face the challenges of life, and those challenges only increase on the path Theosophy points towards.

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But we are afraid that if we so act, the other man will not. So we do not move at all along that line.

Seems to me that this fear is rooted in selfishness. Why does it matter if the other does not act so? Is it truly valid to say that I will not help someone because they might not help me in return, or because they didn't help me in the past, etc.? Seems that this would only ever lead to us acting in accordance with the worst among us - if we are only willing to do that which can be guaranteed to be reciprocated.

So how do we overcome this kind of fear? And societally, how can this approach be changed?

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This becomes a complete non-issue for the one who perceives the essential unity of all beings and Being. Such a person is not extending help to another. Such a person is helping oneself in the guise of another.

This can be changed societally by coming to a collective understanding on this point. For everyone to reach the state of illumination at which total oneness is perceived is not likely but certain other understandings can be reached.

It is normal for many of us to think of certain natural resources--such as air and water--as belonging to nobody in particular, but as something shared, held in common to all. When one drinks a glass of water, one is only borrowing it, making use of it for a time. Same goes for air.

Because it does not exist in the natural world, but instead was invented by humans, it is not so normal for us to think of money this way. But does it not work just like air and water? I get paid x dollars to work, I spend some of those dollars at the grocery store or gas station, and so it circulates through the system, from one person to the next.

Imagine if money were seen in a more similar light to food, air and water, and if we saw ourselves not as "owning" money, but as stewards of a resource that, just like water and air, is simply another form for the universal life force that sets action in motion in the earthly spheres.

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Gandhi spoke about this idea extensively.  He took a vow of non-possession and all the objects of use he became the steward over rather than the possessor of, so to speak.  It is a very interesting idea.  Perhaps this gives us a glimpse into the humanity of the future.

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Reminds me of John Lennon urging us to imagine "no possessions".

Imagine there's no heaven
It's easy if you try ...

Imagine there's no countries
It isn't hard to do ...

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can ...

So according to Lennon, while imagining 'no heaven' and 'no countries' is easy, imagining 'no possessions' is presented as much more of a challenge. I've experimented with this and found it to be true (for me). It seems a very difficult thing to honestly and sincerely practice non-possession. We come repeatedly to the question: "where do we draw the line?". Air? Water? Clothing? Money? Body? Like Daniel says, we're simply borrowing these for a time. But what about elementals? What about personality? Do we imagine ourselves to possess these? What about thought? Do I own "my" thoughts?

This seems to be one of those ideals to always aim for, even though we may continually come up short.

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I've thought of money in the same light and have worked to incorporate this into my approach to the world. It's been an ... interesting challenge. ;)

Of course, the example above could just as easily relate to love as it could to money or other such tangible things. I could be just as likely to say: "I will not love this person if they don't/can't love me back", etc., as I might say: "I will not give this person money if they can't return it". So there does seem to be a deep level of 'selfish insecurity' involved, that likely underlies our approach to many things in life. It seems to be an overarching mental position or state.

Just read this the other day, from the Gospel of Thomas, and thought it was fitting:

Jesus said:

If you have money, 
Do not lend it out at interest
But give it to him
Who will not repay it.

We are proceeding through an article written by Robert Crosbie called "Theosophy in Daily Life".  It is part of a larger work called Universal Theosophy which is collection of his talks given in Los Angeles in the early part of the 1900s.  Robert Crosbie worked very closely with WQ Judge. The next passage is presented here:

 

Do we not see that we can trust a universe that moves along unerringly under the law of perfect justice? ‘We certainly can. We can go forward with an absolute reliance on the law of our own spiritual being, knowing whatever conditions come are necessary for us, knowing that those very things we feel so hardly are object lessons for us because they indicate a wrong tendency or defect in us which this present distress affords us an opportunity to overcome, to strengthen our true character. That is all we have at the end of life, whatever of character—good, bad, or indifferent—we have acquired. Men spend their lives trying to avoid what they do not like, and trying to get what they like—what they can and while they can. Yet if they got all the wealth of the world, every possession and every possible desire, what good would it do them? At death everything would be left where they got it, because nothing adheres to Spirit. The idea of getting for themselves is one of the false notions which prevent men from understanding themselves as spiritual beings and using the power which belongs to them—for all powers of every kind—electrical, dynamic or explosive—come from the One Universal Spirit, and each man has latent in him all the powers in the universe. Physical life is not necessarily a vale of sorrow. The time must come when we shall have made man’s life on earth what it ought to be, when we shall have no fear of anything, when we shall not be afraid of our fellowmen. It was said of Daniel, when he entered the lions’ den, the beasts of prey did not touch him at all. Why? Because his heart was pure. He had no harm in it for anyone. He trusted to the spiritual law of his own being, and all nature makes obeisance to that. We could go out calmly, courageously, happily, relying on the laws of our own natures. If we did so, we would bring our daily lives in line with that nature; for there is nothing of our action which does not come from the mind, and back of the mind is the ‘motive we have in acting. Motive is what makes our actions really “good” or “bad.” If we are righteous in ourselves and desirous of doing right, then all that we do will flow rightly from us and every function will be a righteous function. All action springs from and is colored by the motive held in performing it.

 

Moderator:  How would our lives be different if we actually trusted the universe?

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Do you think that  being anxious about one thing or another happening is an indication of when we don't trust the universe?

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Seems to me that 'trust' derives itself actually from knowledge or wisdom, or arises naturally with those. So, perhaps the main difference in life if we had trust would be the elimination of personal desire and thirst for life (tanha). If, with wisdom, we know that what we are given in life is exactly what is due to us, and exactly what is needed for us to evolve, the delusion that we 'need' this or that and the desire for this or that would fade. What need is there for desiring something for ourselves when we already have all we need? Seems that this is what the Jesus of the Gospels is saying in Matthew 6:25-34.

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I think Crosbie was right on. I had an epiphany 35 years ago that there is perfect order in the Universe and I’ve held this close as a guiding principle. The problem I have is embracing this at all times. Therefore I struggle, fear and respond situationally. 

Knowing that all existence is a growth experience I approach every hurdle with the knowledge that it’s there to better me. My daily job is to relax and live.  

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Dave;  What brought about the epiphany?  What form did it take?  What were you doing at the time?

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"Yet if they got all the wealth of the world, every possession and every possible desire, what good would it do them? At death everything would be left where they got it, because nothing adheres to Spirit."

What percentage of the human race is stuck in this rut?

 

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100% ;)

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100% ;)


Agreed!

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Moderator:  How would our lives be different if we actually trusted the universe?

It may not be possible to fully fathom how life would be different if we actually trusted the universe--given everything that full trust of such a nature actually entails, as described for us by Crosbie.

The most that many of us can manage is to dwell in that state of trust for limited periods of time. Some of us may manage this more often or for longer periods than others. Naturally, it is easier to do when things are going relatively well, or when the "bad" parts are not utterly intolerable. The true test is how we fare when the unthinkable happens, whatever that may be for each of us.


If we truly trusted the universe, then even when conditions become extremely adverse or threatening on the surface, one would still continue to think of others. In this connection, I think of people who, in the midst of hurricane Katrina, used their motorboats to go and help neighbors rather than to flee to safety themselves. That takes trust.

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Excellent point.  Trust is tested when times are hard not when they are easy.

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Many who live an irresponsible life believe that they will be saved after death and will go to heaven - their trust of a savior and afterlife is unshakeable.  Trust, which is often associated with faith, may not be a reliable source since it is not necessarily based on truth. 

As one dedicates oneself to the practice of the Ancient Wisdom, the higher principles begin to stir very slowly. There are moments of insights that deepen one’s understanding and confirm various ideas in the doctrine.  Eventually, there grows a sense of knowingness, due to the awakening of intuitive perception, about some of the principles in the teachings, and it is no longer based on faith or trust. 

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Is there a way to connect the discipline of meditation and skill in action in the world?

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What do we mean when we use the word meditation?

Continuing on with the article by Robert Crosbie by the same name.

"Theosophy is the only philosophy that can be used in every direction in daily life. It can be used in all directions, high or low, because that use comes from an understanding of the Spirit itself, from acting for that Self and as that Self—for the Self acts only through the creatures. Acting for and as that Self in every direction, all else flows into line. All the destruction that is around us, all the misery that we see, has been brought about through our denial of the Holy Ghost—our denial of the Spirit within us. We deny it when we act as if we are our bodies, or our minds. THAT will not be denied. So man, meeting all the results of that denial and seeing them to be evil, learns that this is not the way. Then he seeks for Truth, and finding the truth, obtains all that he can desire—hope, happiness and a better understanding of his and all existence. It was to give to men all they could take in regard to the nature of the soul—that they might come out from this vale of sorrow—that those Beings known as Divine Incarnations have descended here of Their own will. They have carried forward from age to age this knowledge of nature and of man and of the purpose of life, learned through many civilizations of mankind. It is this knowledge which makes Them as gods to us in Their glory and power."

 

Please let us hear your thoughts and questions.

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Why do you think he says Theosophy is the "only" philosophy that can be used in every direction?  Couldn't we say this is true for Buddhist philosophy or others?

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Robert Crosbie may well have had something particular in mind with his phrase "used in every direction".   I'm not familiar with his article.

Speaking in general, I imagine that seekers of all spiritual traditions - whether Buddhist, Hindu, Christian, Muslim and so on - might claim something similar to Robert Crosbie.  Each might talk about the suffering that comes from chasing after the unreal and turning away from the real - whether that 'real' be called God, the Self, our true nature, the divine & so on.  Each might say our lives would be better lived if we heeded the divine/wisdom that abides within each one of us, acting in harmony with that source in all aspects of our lives.  Each in turn might also tell us of great beings who have sought to show the way to the real in order to help poor suffering humanity. The names and titles of those great beings vary depending on the tradition; there are bodhisattvas, buddhas, avatars, prophets, son(s) of god, the great sages, maharishis & so on.  

If Theosophy is the Ancient Wisdom,  the Tree of Knowledge from which all true spiritual traditions have branched forth, then it would not be surprising that the same fundamental truths can be found echoed in all of them - some to a greater degree, others less so. 

I look forward to hearing from someone more familiar with Robert Crosbie's work.

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This sounds right.  Theosophy is the Philosophy behind philosophies, and the Religion behind the religions, we are told.  Also Theosophy is the Wisdom of the universe.  Therefore "Theosophy" (capital T) can be used in every direction as Mr. Crosbie says.  Unless a religion or a philosophy is as universal as the original "Perennial Philosophy" then it would have limits that the original would not.  I hope that makes sense.  This is what I infer from your comments.

It has occurred to me that if Theosophy were properly understood it should be able to address every problem and challenge in human life. 

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Couldn't we say this is true for Buddhist philosophy or others?

I feel we could perhaps say the same about Buddhist philosophy, in its purity. But, what passes as Buddhist philosophy, just as with all religions, seems to have its definite limitations in certain directions, while favoring others.

Now, I think we can say the same about Theosophy. What passes as theosophy here and there may be quite limited, as our understanding of it is also limited, but Theosophy in and of itself should have no limitations in any direction - if it is indeed what it is claimed to be (i.e. "the ocean of knowledge which spreads from shore to shore of the evolution of sentient beings" - WQJ).

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I believe the author is saying that if we stand in the “Self,” we can deal with any situation.  In other words, once we center in our essence, we will see things, as they are, in their proper light and know their value and be able to relate to things in a rightful manner.  Viewing the world from the point of reality, everything falls in place.  

I do not agree that theosophy is the only philosophy that can be used in every direction in daily life.  There are many roads to the Spirit.  If we go beyond the surface, glimmers of truth will reveal itself. 

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This centering idea is very profound.  It seems important to appreciate the challenge and difficulty of centering oneself in a "higher essence'.  There is the monkey mind to deal with , which does not take well to centering.   There is the personal nature and all its proclivities to master.  It is a process of progressive and incremental changes wouldn't you agree?

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How does one begin the process of "acting for and as the Self in every direction"?  What are the first steps?

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I suppose a first step is to begin seeing ourselves as more than just our outer appearance. If we can't see the SELF in our self, it would seem we have little chance of seeing it in others. And perhaps the former leads to the latter...

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This question came up several times in different contexts.  In my opinion, I think it depends on the individual’s constitution, karma, and point of development.  However, there are many commonalities among all the schools regarding the perquisites of attunement.  One that comes to mind is the need for purification.   Until one is purified and go through the process of refinement, the ability to be receptive to truth would be hampered.  Fresh water poured into a stained pot would only get dirty. 

The entire book, Voice of the Silence, is devoted to laying out the steps for the students.  By studying and pondering on the verses, one may find a hint or a directive with which one feels resonance and can start applying it to one’s daily life.  It is a constant effort and the results, more or less if karma permits, depends on the extent of one’s dedication to the Ageless Wisdom.  Once a lesson is mastered, another layer will open up pointing the way.  It is a continuous process unfoldment, with many trials and tribuations, to the earnest students.  Every verse in the Voice of the Silence is a sacred gem, and on pg 63, it states -

          Remember, thou that fightest for man’s liberation, each failure is success and each sincere attempt wins its reward in time.  The holy germs that sprout and grow unseen in the disciple’s soul, their stalks wax strong at each new trial, they bend like reeds but never break, nor can the e’er be lost.  But when the hour has struck they blossom forth.  

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What does purification mean from a Theosophical standpoint?

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In Theosophy as well as in other traditions, lofty moral ethics is the key to purification because it is a process of supplanting the lower elementals in our constitution with higher devic essences that enable us to attune with the finer forces.  In the Voice of the Silence, the seven paramitas are mentioned and they are requirements to unlock the gates (pg 48) -     

1. DANA, the key of charity and love immortal.

2. SHILA, the key of Harmony in word and act, the key that counterbalances the cause and the effect, and leaves no further room for Karmic action.

3. KSHANTI, patience sweet, that nought can ruffle.

4. VIRAG, indifference to pleasure and to pain, illusion conquered, truth alone perceived.

5. VIRYA, the dauntless energy that fights its way to the supernal TRUTH, out of the mire of lies terrestrial.

6. DHYANA, whose golden gate once opened leads the Narjol* toward the realm of Sat eternal and its ceaseless contemplation.

[*A saint, an adept.]

7. PRAJNA, the key to which makes of a man a god, creating him a Bodhisattva, son of the Dhyanis

Additionally, the teachings emphasize on mental purification because thoughts are substances and they affect everything around us and, essentially, we are the product of our thinking.    “As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he”