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Weekly Theme for Contemplation: The Point

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    Profile photo of ModeratorTN
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    The Point in the Circle

     

    Theme for Contemplation: The Point

    “The point at the centre of all things is sacred because it remains unmoved and because it is an axis which links the unmanifest with the manifest.”       — Aquarian Almanac

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Weekly Theme for Contemplation: The Point

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    • Profile photo of Gerry Kiffe
      Gerry Kiffe
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      Profile photo of Gerry KiffeGerry Kiffe

      Is the point essentially a metaphysical concept? Is it outside of space and time?

      • Profile photo of Peter
        Peter
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        Profile photo of PeterPeter

        I’m not sure if it’s outside of space and time, Gerry. It probably depends on how we use that term.  We can refer to a point on the horizon and mean that tree or that building over there.  We can refer to a point in time and mean a day last week, that day we were born or  when we met a loved one etc.  The term point can also refer to a particular stage of change or transformation e.g. boiling point (physical and psychological!).

        In geometry a point has a place in space while at the same time it is essentially without dimension.   Perhaps our awareness or centre of consciousness is just like that – dimensionless and hence ungraspable, yet a presence in both space and time.

         

         

         

         

        • Profile photo of Peter
          Peter
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          Profile photo of PeterPeter

          In geometry a point has a place in space while at the same time it is essentially without dimension.   Perhaps our awareness or centre of consciousness is just like that – dimensionless and hence ungraspable, yet a presence in both space and time.

          ——

          A follow up question to the above might be – if the above is the case is the nature of the point in space (the centre of awareness) the same as the nature of space itself?

          • Profile photo of barbara
            barbara
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            Hi Peter,

            What is the nature of space?

            The little I know about the idea of a point – it is zero dimension and the concept is significant in occult doctrines.  In the book “Man, God, and the Universe” by Taimni, the Theosophical writer postulates that a point (or bindu) is the gate between the manifested and unmanifested.  It is an entrance into the subtle levels and a point serves as a convergent center of the various planes.  When one stands at a point, one has the possibility of entering and experiencing other dimensions.  There is a close connection between dimensions and states of consciousness.   A point has the potentials of developing into a line and into a surface; everything starts from a point and many points can exist together.

            • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of barbara barbara.
            • Profile photo of Peter
              Peter
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              Profile photo of PeterPeter

              Hi Barbara – great to continue exploring with you on the new forum.

              “What is the nature of space?”  If we consider a point of awareness to be a dimensionless point in space (a presence which may be felt but which is essentially formless and ungraspable in its essence) then the kind of space associated with this might be related to that which is described in the Secret Doctrine as ‘bare subjectivity’.  For example:

              ‘This “Be-ness” is symbolised in the Secret Doctrine under two aspects.  On the one hand, absolute abstract Space, representing bare subjectivity. . . On the other, absolute Abstract Motion, representing Unconditioned Consciousness.’  (SD I 14)

              In other words, might it be reasonable to think that pure awareness (a dimensionless point in space) is of the same nature as (or corresponds in some way to) that Be-ness which is both bare subjectivity and unconditioned consciousness?   This is just a question, of course –  a line of enquiry emerging from the germ of an idea (another point).

              Later in the SD, HPB draws on a quote:
              “ Pythagoras considered a point to correspond in proportion to unity… and he defined a point as a Monad having position, and the beginning of all things” (SD I 616)

              Its fair to say that we weave our own futures out of our own existence.

              `

            • Profile photo of Peter
              Peter
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              Profile photo of PeterPeter

              Thanks, Barbara – the point as ‘gateway’ is very valuable.  Examples would be between ‘unmanifest and manifest’, ’noumenon and phenomenon’.   It reminds me of the description of the first un-manifested Logos being a white point within the black face of the circle and then later the third Logos as the black point within the white face of the circle – see Transactions of Blavatsky Lodge, p84 and SD I 1, respectively  (thanks to Pierre for highlighting this important distinction some time ago).

              Perhaps there’s a connection here with what HPB called Laya Centres upon which the worlds are built or placed.  HPB says calls a laya centre “a zero point’ and describes it as a “condition, not a mathematical point.”  (SD I 145)  This might link with your comment about dimensions and states of consciousness.
              ~

      • Profile photo of Samantha Province
        Samantha Province
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        Profile photo of Samantha ProvinceSamantha Province

        Hi Gerry!

        I think of the idea of the point in terms of monads; they are essentially infinitely small centers of consciousness.

        I’ve been reading about Spinoza lately and find his perspective to be illuminating in this context. It’s well known that he saw “God” as infinite and identical to the whole of nature. For him, God has infinitely many aspects of which there are two we know of; extension (or matter) and thought. One does not cause the other, rather they are ultimately identical and parallel each other. He thought space and time applied to extension only, not to thought. From this perspective, we could say the point is outside of time and space while also in a sense being in them.

        • Profile photo of Pierre Wouters
          Pierre Wouters
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          Profile photo of Pierre WoutersPierre Wouters

          Excellent comment Samantha, see also HPB’s comments on the point in the SD.

          “Philosophy, however, could never have formed its conception of a logical, universal, and absolute Deity if it had no Mathematical Point within the Circle to base its speculations upon. It is only the manifested Point, lost to our senses after its pregenetic appearance in the infinitude and incognizability of the Circle, that made a reconciliation between philosophy and theology possible—on condition that the latter should abandon its crude materialistic dogmas. And it is because it has so unwisely rejected the Pythagorean Monad and geometrical figures, that Christian theology has evolved its self-created human and personal God, the monstrous Head from whence flow in two streams the dogmas of Salvation and Damnation. – SDI:613

          Nor did the “hierogram within a Circle, or equilateral Triangle,” ever mean “the exemplification of the unity of the divine Essence”; for this was exemplified by the plane of the boundless Circle. What it really meant was the triune co-equal Nature of the first differentiated Substance, or the con-substantiality of the (manifested) Spirit, matter and the Universe—their “Son,” who proceeds from the Point (the real, esoteric LOGOS) or the Pythagorean MONAD. For the Greek Monas signifies “Unity” in its primary sense. Those unable to seize the difference between the monad—the Universal Unit—and the Monads or the manifested Unity, as also between the ever-hidden and the revealed LOGOS or the Word, ought never to meddle in philosophy, let alone the Esoteric Sciences. […] The Monad—only the emanation and reflection of the Point (Logos) in the phenomenal World—becomes, as the apex of the manifested equilateral triangle, the “Father.” The left side or line is the Duad, the “Mother,” regarded as the evil, counteracting principle (Plutarch, De Placitis Placitorum); the right side represents the Son (“his Mother’s husband” in every Cosmogony, as one with the apex); at the basic line is the Universal plane of productive Nature, unifying on the phenomenal plane Father-Mother-Son, as these were unified in the apex, in the supersensuous World. † By mystic transmutation they became the Quaternary—the triangle became the TETRAKTIS. – SDI:614

          For it became evident that external or material things presented the property of extension to our senses only, not to our thinking faculties. The mathematician, in order to calculate geometrical figures, had been obliged to divide them into an infinite number of infinitely small parts, and the physicist saw no limit to the divisibility of matter into atoms. The bulk through which external things seemed to fill space was a property which they acquired only through the coarseness of our senses. . . . Leibnitz followed these arguments to some extent, but he could not rest content in assuming that matter was composed of a finite number of very small parts. His mathematical mind forced him to carry out the argument in infinitum. And what became of the atoms then? They lost their extension and they retained only their property of resistance; they were the centres of force. They were reduced to mathematical points . . . but if their extension in space was nothing, so much fuller was their inner life. Assuming that inner existence, such as that of the human mind, is a new dimension, not a geometrical but a metaphysical dimension . . . having reduced the geometrical extension of the atoms to nothing, Leibnitz endowed them with an infinite extension in the direction of their metaphysical dimension. After having lost sight of them in the world of space, the mind has, as it were, to dive into a metaphysical world to find and grasp the real essence of what appears in space merely as a mathematical point. . . . As a cone stands on its point, or a perpendicular straight line cuts a horizontal plane only in one mathematical point, but may extend infinitely in height and depth, so the essences of things real have only a punctual existence in this physical world of space; but have an infinite depth of inner life in the metaphysical world of thought . . . ” (p. 144). This is the spirit, the very root of occult doctrine and thought. The “Spirit-Matter” and “Matter-Spirit” extend infinitely in depth, and like “the essence of things” of Leibnitz, our essence of things real is at the seventh depth; while the unreal and gross matter of Science and the external world, is at the lowest end of our perceptive senses. The Occultist knows the worth or worthlessness of the latter.” SDI:628

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    Sunday

     

     

     

    July 28, 2016   Theme for Contemplation: The Point

     

    “The point in the heart grows luminous.

     

     — Brihadaranyaka

     

    “The essnces of things real have only a punctual existence in this physical world of space; but have an infinite depth of inner life in the metaphysical world of thought.”

     — H.P. Blavatsky

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    Monday

     

     

     

    July 29,  2016  Theme for Contemplation: The Point

     

    “We are born with faculties and powers capable of almost anything, such as at least would carry us further than cn be easily imagined; but it is only the exercise of those powers which gives us the ability and skill in anything, and leads us towards perfection.”

     — John Locke

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    Tuesday

     

    August 2,  2016     Theme for Contemplation: The Point

    “Nothing contributes so much to tranquillize the mind as a steady purpose — a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.”

    — Mary Shelley

    “Except for the point, the still point,

    There would be no dance, and there is only the dance.”

    —T.S. Eliot

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    Wednesday

    August 3, 2016     Theme for Contemplation: The Point

     “So he passed over, and all the trumpets sounded for him on the other side.

    — John Bunyan

     “No organism corresponds completely to the Idea that lies at its root; behind everyone the higher Idea is hidden.

    — Goethe 

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    August 4, 2016   Theme for Contemplation:  The Point

    ” The nature of God is a circle of which the centre is everywhere and the circumference nowhere.” 

       Empedocles

    ” God is the centre of everything, whose circumference is nowhere to be found.” 

       Robert Fludd

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    August 5, 2016  Theme for Contemplation: The Point

    “There is within us a little space through which all the threads of the universe are drawn.”  

    — George William Russell

    “We dance round in a ring and suppose,

    But the Secret sits in the middle and knows.”  

    — Robert Frost

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