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Weekly Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers

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    ModeratorTN
    Keymaster

       Weekly Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers

    “The self-consciousness of divine wisdom (Vach) is eternally enacted
    by self-luminous Mahatmas, the Brotherhood of Light.”— Aquarian Almanac

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Weekly Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers


  • ModeratorTN
    Keymaster
    ModeratorTN

    August 11, 2018 Weekly Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers

    The main requisite for acquiring self-knowledge
    is pure love. — H. P. BLAVATSKY


  • Peter
    Moderator
    Peter

    Some questions on recent quotes:

    A) Will creates intelligently; Desire blindly and unconsciously. — Aquarian Axioms

    Is this the case? For example, is the desire to help others and work for humanity blind and unconscious? Is will always intelligent and for good?

    B) God dwells wherever we let him in. — Hasidic Saying

    How should a student of theosophy make sense of this when the Mahatma KH writes,“Neither our philosophy nor ourselves believe in a God, least of all in one whose pronoun necessitates a capital H.” (Mahatma Letters to Sinnett no.10, Barker Ed.). Is there a place in the universe where ‘Atman’ (the ‘God’ in us) is not present?

    C) The main requisite for acquiring self-knowledge is pure love. — H. P. BLAVATSKY

    Is this an actual quote from HPB? Is there a reference?

    In a small article attributed to her HPB does say the following about self-knowledge:

    The first necessity for obtaining self-knowledge is to become profoundly conscious of ignorance; to feel with every fibre of the heart that one is ceaselessly self-deceived.

    The second requisite is the still deeper conviction that such knowledge—such intuitive and certain knowledge—can be obtained by effort.

    The third and most important is an indomitable determination to obtain and face that knowledge.
    (From Collected Writings vol 8, p108)

    ~~


    • barbara
      Participant
      barbara

      Hi Peter:

      Great questions.

      Regarding self-knowledge, I was just writing to friend yesterday to say that our ignorance is truly “profound”. How very little we really know and see reality!!!!


    • Ramprakash ML
      Participant
      Ramprakash ML

      “God dwells wherever we let him in”

      How do we take it when there is no God ?

      HPB somewehre says on the question of God to the effect that it depends on what we mean by that term

      If we ascribe anthropomorphic attributive to Reality —things as they are, not as we think or conceive, or things in themselves — then, of course, we fall into a series of logical fallacies.

      Yet That has to be referred to in some way, by some symbol, some conception.

      Nearest to truth would be to refer That as Self or Atman which cannot be known but which one essential is but forgotten yet recoverable

      Upanishads say that Self is known by him whom Self chooses

      All that we can do is to prepare ourselves for the vivifying rays of the Spiritual Sun to illuminate our mind and heart and dispel darkness

      Judge says that it may not be known for ages or may be known next instant or this moment.


    • James
      Participant
      James

      Hi Peter…On God;
      That particular ML quote is rather misleading as they are talking about the God of the churches that forgives our sins etc. not how it is generally used in Esotericism.

      THEOSOPHIST. Please say “God” and not a God. In our sense, the inner man is the only God we can have cognizance of. And how can this be otherwise? Grant us our postulate that God is a universally diffused, infinite principle, and how can man alone escape from being soaked through by, and in, the Deity? We call our “Father in heaven” KT section 5

      HPB;‘the Bible is not the “Word of God,” but contains at best the words of fallible men and imperfect teachers. Yet read esoterically, it does contain, if not the whole truth, still, “nothing but the truth,” Therefore esoterically God must be Ishvara.

      “Ishvara can be translated as God” Ravi Ravindra’s Yoga Sutras 1-23. Most other English translation, including Vivakananda use God this way.

      Esoterically God normally refers to the Divine Monad, or spark of God in man, with Atman being its first step into matter. Although the more exoteric teaching have Atman as God. Either system is acceptable as long as one does not mix them up.
      Therefore there must also be a God outside man as well to produce that spark.


      • Peter
        Moderator
        Peter

        Hello James – I see it differently to your good self, namely that that particular passage from the Mahatma Letters refers to much more than the god of the churches who forgives us our sins. The interested reader might care to read Mahatma Letter no. 10 in full alongside Subba Row’s article ‘Personal and Impersonal God’ (in ‘Five Years of Theosophy) to appreciate the underlying metaphysical basis in Theosophy and the Arhat tradition that Mahatma KH seeks to explain. The Mahatma rejects the existence of either a personal or an impersonal god. But even if that quote from the ML referred only to a personal god who forgives our sins it would still be relevant to our passage from Hassidic Judaism posted by Moderator. As far as I know, the Hassidic Jew does not view the male God that s/he prays to and worships as referring to the Monad, Atman or an impersonal god & so on.. Ramprakash raises a good point when saying we need to know what is meant by the term ‘God’ whenever it is used, and this reflects the aim of my initial question.

        Whether we should take the Iswara of the Yoga Sutras or even the Divine Monad (Atma-Buddhi) to be God is yet another question and is still in the realm of the exoteric, I would say. The Mahatma writes in the above mentioned letter that “Iswara is the effect of Avidya and Maya, ignorance based upon the great delusion.’ This is congruent with what we find in the Secret Doctrine, which states:

        ‘The Logos, or both the unmanifested and the manifested Word, is called by the Hindus, Iswara, “the Lord,” though the Occultists give it another name. Iswara, say the Vedantins, is the highest consciousness in nature. “This highest consciousness,” answer the Occultists, “is only a synthetic unit in the world of the manifested Logos — or on the plane of illusion; for it is the sum total of Dhyan-Chohanic consciousnesses.” “Oh, wise man, remove the conception that not-Spirit is Spirit,” says Sankarâchârya. Atma is not-Spirit in its final Parabrahmic state, Iswara or Logos is Spirit; or, as Occultism explains, it is a compound unity of manifested living Spirits, the parent-source and nursery of all the mundane and terrestrial monads, plus their divine reflection, which emanate from, and return into, the Logos, each in the culmination of its time.’ (SD I 573)

        We might see a relationship between the Samkhya philosophy (of which the Yoga Sutras appears to be a systemisation of its tenets and practices) and the Occult view expressed above. The Samkhya philosophy advocates Reality as a form of metaphysical dualism made up of Purusha and Prakriti (spirit and matter). Purusha is not to be seen as a single entity but as a plurality of purushas. Perhaps, as in the passage above from the SD, we could call it a compound unity of living spirits or monads or dhyanis. In the Yoga Sutras Isvara is described, not as God, but as ‘a special kind of purusha’ (I.iv). The interested student may wish to explore whether this special kind of purusha might be related to the Star-Angel or Dhyani-Buddha mentioned in the Secret Doctrine:

        ‘The star under which a human Entity is born, says the Occult teaching, will remain for ever its star, throughout the whole cycle of its incarnations in one Manvantara. But this is not his astrological star. The latter is concerned and connected with the personality, the former with the INDIVIDUALITY. The ‘Angel’ of that Star, or the Dhyani-Buddha will be either the guiding or simply the presiding “Angel” so to say, in every new rebirth of the monad, which is part of his own essence, though his vehicle, man, may remain forever ignorant of this fact. The adepts have each their Dhyani-Buddha, their elder “twin Soul,” and they know it, calling it “Father-Soul,” and “Father-Fire”. It is only at the last and supreme initiation, however, that they learn it when placed face to face with the bright “Image.”’ (SD I 572-573)

        There’s a lot to unravel here, of course. To my mind the term ‘God’ hinders rather than helps. But coming back to where we started, with that hassidic quote, perhaps we could reframe it as ‘inner guidance dwells where we let it in’.

        ~~


  • ModeratorTN
    Keymaster
    ModeratorTN

    August 13, 2018 Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers

    Blessed is he who stands at the Beginning, for he understands
    the end without tasting death. — JESUS


  • ModeratorTN
    Keymaster
    ModeratorTN

    August 14, 2018 Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers

    That man who sees inaction in action and action in
    inaction is wise among men. — SHRI KRISHNA


  • ModeratorTN
    Keymaster
    ModeratorTN

    August 15, 2018 Theme for Contemplation: The Silent Watchers

    I believe that the sum total of the energy of mankind is not
    to bring us down but to lift us up. — M. K. GANDHI

© 2017 Universal Theosophy

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