Shen Rampersaud

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Shen Rampersaud


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      God protects the silent man. — Persian Proverb
      June 15, 2017 at 6:53 am #5831

      This is the first time I’ve come across this proverb. It’s profound and the following comes to mind. Excessive speech with our peers and excessive inner monologue creates a cloud that blurs intuitive knowing. This cloud is the antithesis of silence. Intuitive knowing is most accessible in silence and it’s the safeguard against choices that do not serve us.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      “Live with each other as brothers; for the misery and the trouble of the world are of more importance than all the scientific progress that may be imagined.”

      In response to this point, I question (rhetorically) why our priorities are collectively skewed to value progress over brotherhood. When did we conclude that we can only have one and not the other?

      Innovation will better lives to the extent that universal brotherhood is imbued in the effort. It is the core intention and fuel that allows scientific progress to be applied altruistically.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      Yes, I would say the same.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      Péguy’s words were stated during institutional conflicts. Yet breaches can also show up as unique and personalized growing pains that serve as opportunities. There are no pioneers without breaches and no frontiers without pioneers. Very few triumphs are more fulfilling than to be your own.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      The response to feeling woe and grief is one of either non-attachment or clinging. Clinging is a result of identifying with the many reactions to feelings. And this obscures truth.

      Being touched by pain is not a sign of attachment. The deterrent to non-attachment is the spiral of thoughts, emotions, fruitless meaning, reactive actions, etc. that proceeds feelings. Identifying with them is immobilizing and illusory. In regards to the Viraga Paramita, I believe that indifference to our reactions to pleasure and pain is a great necessity to dissolve their impact.

      Upekkha is subtle and delicate; it is neutrality and a non-reactivity without being emotionally shut off. Because equanimity is not indifference, I don’t see “feeling the right amount of woe and grief” as an intermediate state. Great question, Pierre, and I hope this helps.

      We don’t need to feel pain over and over just to serve others. Figuratively, we touch a hot skillet on a stove, and must let go quickly! The burning sensation is understood and there is no need to hold on. We leave this experience with a core understanding to assist those who have similar or greater “burns.”


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      This is a good point, Pavel.

      Detachment without indifference is a delicate skill, but an essential one in being engaged and responsive. With upekkha, one is not swayed by the daily current of stimuli.

      Upekkha demands some of the qualities of nekkhamma (renunciation), as one of the perfections. Arguably, equanimity lies on this foundation.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      A tough dilemma.

      To assist another with empathy and effectiveness requires feeling the right amount of woe and grief. Too little leads to apathetic inaction and too much incapacitates both parties all the same. A balance is necessary, and the barometer for balance can only be felt.

      Bearing personal sorrow without drowning is a requisite. This is where soul wisdom is essential in understanding the hollow nature, transience, and silver lining of sorrow as one of many human experiences. This gives way for the detachment that enables people to respond appropriately for themselves and others.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      Maintaining order in one’s internal city, as Plato states, is necessary for the “peace between nations” that Black Elk references (post #5930 on July 3, 2017 at 6:51 am). The latter has no sustenance when disarray is the internal status quo.

      “As within, so without” the saying goes…


    • Shen Rampersaud
      Participant
      Shen Rampersaud

      Hi Pavel,

      This is a crucial and grave question that is faced often. I find it difficult too. One stepping-stone involves reframing “response” and “limited abilities” since visible, immediate, and global change is unlikely. We are still not ineffective when we…

      1) acknowledge and hold space for suffering, which is transformative and coincides with your point on acceptance
      2) influence progress via organizations with greater impact and outreach
      3) do our part where we are (even if it means saving someone’s day from displaced anger)

      The balance, I believe, to widespread and immobilizing suffering is consistency in local-scale efforts. This includes daily compassion and the willingness to try. Worldwide suffering is a collection of moments and lives over time. And so is global healing.


    • Shen Rampersaud
      Participant
      Shen Rampersaud

      Response to Paul Brunton’s Words

      A cup is a cup in part due to the space in it. This is normally unacknowledged. And so it is uncommon to give credit to logic and caution in the context of intuition, and zeal, respectively. When concepts such as aspiration, faith, and peace need a lending hand, it’s an oversimplification to conclude that they’re fruitful on their own (e.g. “all we really need is _______”).


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      In support of your comment, we have two ears and one mouth. The listening-to-talking ratio is clear.


    • Shen Rampersaud
      Participant
      Shen Rampersaud

      To expand on Emerson’s quote, cordial speech, which proceeds cordial intention, begins within one’s thoughts. The rest is a domino effect.

      Mann’s words are a great reminder that awareness is the most basic “ingredient” that regards each moment as sacred. Awareness makes meaning easier to realize and resistance easier to release.


    • Shen Rampersaud
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      Shen Rampersaud

      Pavel Axentiev
      May 21, 2017 at 10:52 pm #5694

      Qualitative scientific research in the social sciences legitimatizes the subjective experience. And so the possibility remains…

      I agree that the scientific method is not quite the problem. In response to your last sentence, Pavel, the way that science is perceived indeed limits its study and judgement of inner knowing.

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